A cancer-killing bone replacement wonder-material

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 
Award Amount: 
£118,917.50
Duration: 
42 months

Sarcoma UK is investing in research leaders of the future. Our PhD programme aims to start a researcher’s career in sarcoma by funding a training fellowship which focuses on a hypothesis-driven research project.

This project is building on previous work, developing a bone replacement material which specifically kills cancer cells, actively encourages the growth of new bone cells and contains an antibacterial agent which reduces the possibility of surgical site infection.

Understanding resistance to chemotherapy

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 
Award Amount: 
£120,000
Duration: 
42 months

Sarcoma UK is investing in research leaders of the future. Our PhD programme aims to start a researcher’s career in sarcoma by funding a training fellowship which focuses on a hypothesis-driven research project.

This project is looking to unpick the cellular processes and behaviours which determine if a person will respond to chemotherapy. How cells signal to each other is thought to affect how they respond to treatment. Understanding these processes will allow clinicians to personalise medicine by identifying the patients who will respond to chemotherapy before treatment has started. If the patient is unlikely to respond, another drug may be considered or the patient can be spared the side effects of chemotherapy.

Capturing the sarcoma cells that got away

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

University of Southampton

Award Amount: 
£24,820

This project uses new cutting edge techniques to compare rhabdomyosarcoma cells which do and don’t respond to chemotherapy. By understanding how some cells resist chemotherapy, we can work towards making them responsive to treatment.   

Tracing Sarcoma’s footprints

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

University College London

Award Amount: 
£120,000

This PhD project will use new computational approaches to identify where sarcomas have made changes to a person’s DNA and left a footprint (or ‘mutation signature’). Once these footprints can be identified in DNA, they can be used to identify which patients will respond to specific treatment. It will train a researcher of the future in this cutting edge research field.

Identifying and stopping cancer’s little helpers

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

University of Sheffield

Award Amount: 
£24,677

One of the cell types found in a sarcoma tumour is a fibroblast. Fibroblasts are known to be very important in the growth and spread of other cancers, but much less is known about how they work in sarcoma. This project will investigate the role of fibroblasts in soft tissue sarcoma. The more we know about how fibroblasts affect the growth and spread of sarcoma, the better we can fight it.

Developing crucially needed treatments for advanced Kaposi’s sarcoma

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

Birkbeck College, University of London

Award Amount: 
£23,934

Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancer resulting from infection by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. There are no effective treatments for the advanced disease. This project is searching for potential new treatments by developing methods of blocking the damaging proteins produced by the virus.

Searching for what drives uterine leiomyosarcoma, and how to stop it

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

Newcastle University 

Award Amount: 
£24,631

Uterine leiomyosarcoma is a poorly understood cancer that doesn’t respond well to current treatment methods. This project is working towards changing that by using powerful new techniques to understand more about how this cancer grows and spreads, and by testing a promising new class of drugs for their effectiveness in treating uterine leiomyosarcoma.

Paving the way for future advancements in the treatment of chondrosarcoma

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

University of Liverpool

Award Amount: 
£20,750

This project will investigate the role of molecules known as ‘small non-coding RNAs’ in chondrosarcoma. These molecules have been shown to have potential as targets for treatment, but we don’t know enough about how they work yet. This project will provide the crucial first steps from which future researchers can build towards treatments for chondrosarcoma.

Improving soft-tissue sarcoma diagnosis

Principal Investigators: 

Professor David Gonzalez de Castro

Institution: 

Queen's University Belfast 

Award Amount: 
£23,749

Correctly diagnosing which type of soft tissue sarcoma a patient has is crucial for ensuring they receive the best possible care. This project is developing a diagnostic method which can be used to identify which soft tissue sarcoma type a person has using either a blood or tissue sample, so patients could be put on the best drug and treatment pathway at an earlier stage knowing it has a higher chance of success.  

Looking to dogs for the answers

Principal Investigators: 

Professor Matthew Allen

Institution: 

University of Cambridge 

Award Amount: 
£109,953

Osteosarcoma is much more common in dogs than humans. This project looks at the blood tests results of dogs being treated for osteosarcoma, in order to study the connection between levels of circulating tumour cells and disease progression. As the disease pattern of osteosarcoma in dogs and humans is the same, answers from dogs could translate into results for people.

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