Does where you live affect your sarcoma diagnosis?

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£24,305

This project is using data sets from Public Health England and Sarcoma UK’s National Sarcoma Survey to look at how a person’s social background can affect’s their sarcoma journey and their route to a diagnosis.

Developing a test to predict which tumours will return

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£25,000

When cancer cells have low levels of oxygen they are harder to treat and have a higher chance of returning after surgery. This project is developing a method which can measure the amount of oxygen in soft tissue sarcoma cells. With this information, harder to treat sarcomas can be identified early. The data can also be used to identify drugs which target these low-level oxygen cancer cells.

Stopping the spread of sarcoma from the limbs

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£24,905

Cancer-killing viruses can be used to treat limb sarcomas if delivered using a special technique which allows the treatment to be given straight to the affected area. However, although this treatment can prevent a tumour from growing, it cannot prevent it from spreading through the body. This project is looking at ways to combine this technique with drugs which activate the body’s immune system, with the aim of developing a treatment that can prevent both growth and spread of these soft tissue sarcomas.

Putting the pressure on osteosarcoma

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£25,000

This project investigates how the internal pressure of osteosarcoma tumours effects the growth and spread of the tumour. By gaining a better understanding of the role of internal pressure in osteosarcoma, it can be harnessed and targeted in treatments. 

Flicking off the switch for Chordoma

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£25,000

Chordoma is a rare and difficult to treat bone cancer. Previous research has shown that a protein called brachyury is active in chordoma cancer cells, and when this protein is not active the cancer cells die. This project is investigating how this protein becomes active in chordoma and potential ways to switch it off.

Will the drugs work for me?

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£119,960

Drugs which work well for some patients with soft tissue sarcoma can, in other patients, only work for a short time, or not work at all. This project is investigating why different cases of soft tissue sarcoma respond so differently to the same drugs. If you can accurately predict how a patient will respond to treatment, no crucial time is wasted.

Development of a sarcoma-specific patient-reported outcome measure S-PROM

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 
Award Amount: 
£119,464

The Roger Wilson Research Award 

Patient experience is central to measuring the quality of care in the NHS, and government policy encourages the use of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) to facilitate patient-clinician communication. However, patients with sarcoma may have experiences which are not reflected accurately with standard or generic PRO measures (PROMs). The aim of this project is to develop a sarcoma-specific PROM (S-PROM) and a strategy to incorporate this into clinical practice.

Can a holistic model of rehabilitation improve quality of life after treatment for lower extremity sarcoma? A pilot and feasibility study

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£33,080

The Roger Wilson Research Award 

The team have developed an approach which uses new ways of assessing disability in hospital and at home to develop a personalised rehabilitation plan for sarcoma patients.

GeDDiS TransBio: Translational study to investigate prognostic and predictive immune biomarkers in soft tissue sarcoma (STS)

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 
Award Amount: 
£75,161

Patients with inoperable or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma have a poor prognosis with overall survival rates (of approximately a year) when treated with current first line palliative chemotherapy. There has been no change in the standard of care for over 20 years. Improved outcomes could be achieved by identifying biomarkers that can select soft tissue sarcoma patients most likely to benefit from current and novel therapies.  

Does PET-MRI of myxofibrosarcoma improve the local staging of disease compared to standard MRI? A pilot and feasibility study

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£19,212

Myxofibrosarcomas are cancers that most commonly develop in the limbs. Surgery is the main treatment but because of the way these cancers grow, it is a challenge to successfully remove them. Unlike other cancers that are easily visible to the surgeon, myxofibrosarcomas often infiltrate nearby tissues making it difficult to accurately assess how much cancer is present. There is a risk that some cancer is left behind after surgery, and this may result in a poorer outcome for the patient.

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