Searching for what drives uterine leiomyosarcoma, and how to stop it

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

Newcastle University 

Award Amount: 
£24,631

Uterine leiomyosarcoma is a poorly understood cancer that doesn’t respond well to current treatment methods. This project is working towards changing that by using powerful new techniques to understand more about how this cancer grows and spreads, and by testing a promising new class of drugs for their effectiveness in treating uterine leiomyosarcoma.

Paving the way for future advancements in the treatment of chondrosarcoma

Principal Investigators: 
Institution: 

University of Liverpool

Award Amount: 
£20,750

This project will investigate the role of molecules known as ‘small non-coding RNAs’ in chondrosarcoma. These molecules have been shown to have potential as targets for treatment, but we don’t know enough about how they work yet. This project will provide the crucial first steps from which future researchers can build towards treatments for chondrosarcoma.

Improving soft-tissue sarcoma diagnosis

Principal Investigators: 

Professor David Gonzalez de Castro

Institution: 

Queen's University Belfast 

Award Amount: 
£23,749

Correctly diagnosing which type of soft tissue sarcoma a patient has is crucial for ensuring they receive the best possible care. This project is developing a diagnostic method which can be used to identify which soft tissue sarcoma type a person has using either a blood or tissue sample, so patients could be put on the best drug and treatment pathway at an earlier stage knowing it has a higher chance of success.  

Looking to dogs for the answers

Principal Investigators: 

Professor Matthew Allen

Institution: 

University of Cambridge 

Award Amount: 
£109,953

Osteosarcoma is much more common in dogs than humans. This project looks at the blood tests results of dogs being treated for osteosarcoma, in order to study the connection between levels of circulating tumour cells and disease progression. As the disease pattern of osteosarcoma in dogs and humans is the same, answers from dogs could translate into results for people.

Developing a blood test to see if sarcoma has spread

Principal Investigators: 

Dr Robin Young

Award Amount: 
£24,750

We don’t fully understand how sarcoma spreads through the body, it is thought that sarcoma cells travel in the bloodstream from the tumour site to other sites in the body. This study will look at whether we can identify these cells in the bloodstream. We’ll take samples from patients under our care and try to match any disease spread with different cells types.  

Using viruses to kill cancer cells

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£63,606

Some viruses can be modified to attack cancer cells, whilst leaving healthy cells unharmed. However, it can be hard for the viruses to reach the tumours to attack, without the body’s immune system attacking the viruses. This project is looking at combining cancer-killing viruses with a technique that allows for to get them straight to the affected limb. This will give the virus the helping hand it needs to reach the tumour without being destroyed by body’s immune system.

Does where you live affect your sarcoma diagnosis?

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£24,305

This project is using data sets from Public Health England and Sarcoma UK’s National Sarcoma Survey to look at how a person’s social background can affect’s their sarcoma journey and their route to a diagnosis.

Developing a test to predict which tumours will return

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£25,000

When cancer cells have low levels of oxygen they are harder to treat and have a higher chance of returning after surgery. This project is developing a method which can measure the amount of oxygen in soft tissue sarcoma cells. With this information, harder to treat sarcomas can be identified early. The data can also be used to identify drugs which target these low-level oxygen cancer cells.

Stopping the spread of sarcoma from the limbs

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£24,905

Cancer-killing viruses can be used to treat limb sarcomas if delivered using a special technique which allows the treatment to be given straight to the affected area. However, although this treatment can prevent a tumour from growing, it cannot prevent it from spreading through the body. This project is looking at ways to combine this technique with drugs which activate the body’s immune system, with the aim of developing a treatment that can prevent both growth and spread of these soft tissue sarcomas.

Putting the pressure on osteosarcoma

Principal Investigators: 
Award Amount: 
£25,000

This project investigates how the internal pressure of osteosarcoma tumours effects the growth and spread of the tumour. By gaining a better understanding of the role of internal pressure in osteosarcoma, it can be harnessed and targeted in treatments. 

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