Sometimes sarcoma cancer can reappear in the same area after the treatment of a previous tumour; this is called a recurrence.

If the cancer does reappear, it is important to get treated as quickly as possible. This could involve further surgery and/or radiotherapy; your treatment will be assessed on an individual basis.

It is important to check for recurrences yourself through self-examination: your doctor or sarcoma clinical nurse specialist can tell you what to look for.

If you are worried about your cancer returning, contact your doctor or nurse. They may decide to bring forward the date of your follow up appointment to investigate your concerns. 

Can sarcoma spread to other parts of the body?

A recurrence of sarcoma may be accompanied by cancer in other parts of the body. This is called metastasis or secondary cancer.

Some people are diagnosed with sarcoma because their metastases have been discovered before their primary sarcoma tumour.

In sarcoma patients, these secondary cancers may appear in the lungs, which is why a chest x-ray is taken at follow-up appointments.

Secondary cancers may also appear in the liver or brain.

Treatment for secondary cancer may involve surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy as appropriate; your treatment will be assessed on an individual basis.